Travel is tough on the diet.  Lots of snacks, strange local foods, greasy spoon cafes, restaurants at airports, terminals and hotels, make it extremely difficult to maintain proper nutrition and manage diabetes

 

Some ideas on how to survive when traveling

EXTENDbar — Great for trips. The snack that helps to control blood sugar for up to 9 hours! The unique combination of ingredients was designed to convert to blood sugar more gradually than any other food to help stabilize blood sugar levels. Purchase EXTENDbar at Drugstore.com

 

MyPyramid.gov

The United States Department of Agriculture recently revised the basic food pyramid. To better understand how it relates to you visit their website and use the variety of learning tools they have provided. The following is a sample of what is available.

The MyPyramid Plan allows you to enter your age, sex and activity level for a quick estimate of what you can eat.

The MyPyramid Tracker provides a detailed assessment of your food intake and physical activity level.

The Inside MyPyramid helps you to get the most from your calories.

 

The following excerpt from AARP Health and Wellness has a number of good ideas for the diabetic traveler.This article is not specifically written for individuals traveling with diabetes it can easily be modified for your specific diabetes situation

 

Eating Right When Eating on the Run

Whether you’re traveling or on the go at home, you don’t need to give up eating right. In fact, healthy eating is more important than ever when you’re trying to keep up with a hectic schedule.

A good diet helps your body withstand stress better. But as you’re hustling to catch a flight or make a meeting on time, you’re probably not thinking about making your next meal a healthy one. The following tips can help you eat well when you’re eating out.

In Restaurants

Tempting menus, large portions, and festive atmospheres make it easy to skip healthy eating. Splurging once in awhile is okay, but you’ll begin to pack on pounds if you make it a habit. Be smart when you eat out. Choose restaurants wisely. Restaurants that offer a variety of foods are a good choice. Avoid all-you-can-eat, buffet-only, and dessert-cart places. Try going Asian or vegetarian. They will give you a lot of tasty options. Avoid diet traps. Pass on the bread and butter. Stick with water. If you must have an appetizer, order soup made with broth rather than cream. Nix the gravies, rich sauces, and breaded and fried foods. Get salad dressing on the side. Opt for steamed, poached, broiled, baked, grilled, roasted, stir-fried, or lightly sauteed foods. If the restaurant servings are huge, split an entrée, order one or two appetizers instead, or immediately doggy-bag half your meal for the next day. Eat the same portions out that you do at home. Try herbal tea or decaffeinated coffee for dessert. If you absolutely can’t resist the dessert tray, split your sweets with at least one other diner. Consider ordering a la carte. It might cost more, but your portions are likely to be smaller. You also have a better chance of getting just what you want, the way you want it.

In Airports

Airports can be stressful places. But don’t scrap your diet because of it. Eat because you’re hungry, not because you’re stressed, bored, or trying to kill time. If you’re anxious or have time to spare, take a walk. Airports usually have plenty of room for a brisk jaunt.Scope out your dining options. There are a lot more than there used to be, with more healthy choices. Skip the hot dog and pizza joints and look for eateries that serve fruit, soup, sushi, and sandwiches or wraps. Order ahead. If your flight includes a meal, request a special diet when you make your reservation. You might be able to choose a low-salt or low-fat option, or a diet or vegetarian plate. And when the beverage cart rolls your way, ask for water or juice instead of alcohol or soda. You’ll feel better when you land. Come Prepared. Bring your own food if you’re leaving or arriving very early or late when eateries are likely to be closed. You don’t have to pack a picnic. A whole-wheat bagel or crackers, a piece of fruit, granola bar, juice box, or cut-up cheese and vegetables can save you from feeling starved.

In Fast Food Places

If you find your only option is fast food, check out different menus. Some fast food places have healthier food than others. You can find soup, salads, baked potatoes, and yogurt with fruit and granola. Fast food doesn’t have to mean you’re stuck with greasy burgers, fries, and soda. You might find “light” options on some menus, too.

Check out our Travel Library or OnlineDiabetesBooks.com for great selections on how to eat right when you are on the road